Image: Fake news USA Today outs itself, bogus reporting galore

Get Awesome Patriot Gear Today! Pay Just S&H For Most Items!



(Natural News)
The vast majority of Americans simply don’t trust the media and that has been a well-established fact for years.

The reason is clear: The ‘mainstream media’ is a propaganda entity for the left-wing deep state, pushing disinformation and pre-selected narratives in order to advance certain political objectives.

The national media doesn’t report what is relevant to the lives of most Americans and they certainly do not serve as a check on those in power — at least not those with a “D” behind their names. That’s because nearly all journalism schools teach students not how to question authority and dig deep into their subjects, but rather to serve as echo chambers and activists for the left.

But those same schools must also teach students arrogance because a new survey indicates today’s reporters and journalists have a much higher opinion of themselves and their work than most Americans do.

“A new survey from the Pew Research Center found that journalists give themselves high marks for reporting the news, but their readers in the general public don’t agree with the grade given,” Lifesite News reported.

The research and polling form found there is a huge disconnect when it comes to the “five core functions of journalism: covering the most important stories of the day, reporting the news accurately, serving as a watchdog over elected leaders, giving voice to the underrepresented, and managing or correcting misinformation.”

“In all five areas, journalists give far more positive assessments than the general public of the work news organizations are doing,” the survey, released on June 14, reported. “And on four of the five items, Americans on the whole are significantly more likely to say the news media is doing a bad job than a good job.”

Brighteon.TV

“For example, while 65% of journalists say news organizations do a very or somewhat good job reporting the news accurately, 35% of the public agrees, while 43% of U.S. adults say journalists do a bad job of this,” Pew reported.

According to the survey, journalists also said they “feel connected” to their readers, but obviously, it’s a one-way-street relationship.

“Similarly, while nearly half of journalists (46%) say they feel extremely or very connected with their audiences, only about a quarter of the public (26%) feels that connection with their main news organizations,” noted the Pew center.

“A little over half of journalists surveyed (55%) say that in reporting the news, every side does not always deserve equal coverage, greater than the share who say journalists should always strive to give every side equal coverage (44%),” the survey found.

“Just over half (55%) think journalists are largely able to keep their views out of their reporting, while 43% say journalists are often unable to,” the survey wrapped up.

The results are a further indication that the “media bubble is real,” according to The Hill media analyst Joe Concha.

“To say there’s a disconnect between many journalists and the public they serve is a gross understatement,” Concha, who is also a Fox News contributor, wrote in a column last week following the survey’s release.

“So why the disconnect? Perhaps it’s like the old saying about the key to good real estate: Location, location location,” he pointed out. “Most of the national media are located in two places: New York City and Washington, D.C.”

He went on to point out that the editorial board of The New York Times has not endorsed a Republican for president in 66 years, adding that the Washington Post has never done so. Concha added that would “probably be a bad idea to share your party affiliation” if a reporter was a GOP voter and worked at either of those publications.

Sources include:

LifeSiteNews.com

Newsfakes.com

Survive the News