Why can Argentina count 25-30 million paper ballots in hours, while blue U.S. swing states take DAYS with machines? – NaturalNews.com

Why can Argentina count 25-30 million paper ballots in hours, while blue U.S. swing states take DAYS with machines?

It’s quite astonishing that the United States of America, one of the most powerful nations in the world, struggles to hold streamlined elections. We’ve gone from having election results on the same night or in the early hours to prolonged counts of sketchy ballots behind closed doors, with the winner remaining unknown for days on end. And these types of rinky-dink elections with long “third world” delays are being normalized, but it’s far from normal, and we all know it. This unacceptable stark contrast was glaringly obvious during the recent presidential election in Argentina, where they efficiently tallied 25 to 30 million paper ballots within hours. Meanwhile, certain blue districts in the United States, using machine ballots, take days to count a fraction of that number. How does one reconcile this?

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(Article republished from Revolver.news)

End Wokeness:

Argentina: 25-30 million paper ballots

Maricopa (2020): 1.9 million ballots

Milwaukee (2020): 460k ballots

Detroit (2020): 250k ballots

Fulton (2020): 523k ballots

Explain to me how Argentina hand-counted all of their ballots in a few hours, but the big blue areas in our swing states take several days with machines?

The voting process in Argentina was streamlined and efficient.

Politico:

Voting stations opened at 8 a.m. (1100 GMT) and close 10 hours later. Voting is conducted with paper ballots, making the count unpredictable, but initial results were expected around three hours after polls close.

Milei went from blasting the country’s “political caste” on TV to winning a lawmaker seat two years ago. The economist’s screeds resonated widely with Argentines angered by their struggle to make ends meet, particularly young men.

“Money covers less and less each day. I’m a qualified individual, and my salary isn’t enough for anything,” Esteban Medina, a 26-year-old physical therapist from Ezeiza, on the outskirts of Buenos Aires, told The Associated Press on the sidelines of a Milei rally earlier this week.

Concerned about the possibility of unreliable elections similar to those in the U.S., officials in Argentina closely monitored the voting process. The Politico article elaborates on this:

The vote takes place amid Milei’s allegations of possible electoral fraud, reminiscent of those from Trump and former Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro. Without providing evidence, Milei claimed that the first round of the presidential election was plagued by irregularities that affected the result. Experts say such irregularities cannot swing an election, and that his assertions are partly aimed at firing up his base and motivating his supporters to become monitors of voting stations.

Such claims spread widely on social media and, at Milei’s rally in Ezeiza earlier this week, all those interviewed told the AP they were concerned about the integrity of the vote.

Perhaps it’s worth considering the idea of outsourcing our elections to Argentina’s capable hands? That might ensure we learn the results within a day and alleviate concerns about Democrats cheating. What an embarrassment we’ve become.

Read more at: Revolver.news

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